click here for  Animal Specialties
Your Text Ad Here! Only 41¢ a day!
click here for details
Locate a business by name: click to list your business
search the classifieds. buy an account
reptile events by zip code list an event
News & Events: This snake's feet weren't made for walking . . . . . . . . . .  Forsten’s Cat Snake: The big guy in the cat snake family . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Panther Chameleon . . . . . . . . . .  No babies yet for last female turtle of her species . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Asian Vine Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Loggerheads: Don't try this at home! . . . . . . . . . .  Mid-Kansas Herping . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eastern Box Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  A frog's best defense may threaten its future . . . . . . . . . .  My reptile management lecture ends up with the best audience . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Cat Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Man shot with his own gun while trying to protect sea turtle babies . . . . . . . . . .  Camouflaged tortoises, hiding in plain sight . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black Headed Python . . . . . . . . . .  Slender Coral Snake: The shy-natured venomous snake . . . . . . . . . .  British herpers asked to stop flipping tin . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Copperhead . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sulawesi Forest Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  The Bruni dump: one man's trash is a herper's treasure . . . . . . . . . .  Celebrate the snake on World Snake Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Drymarchon . . . . . . . . . .  Fangs like a weapon: the variegated kukri . . . . . . . . . .  Blanding's turtles may gain protection as endangered species . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Hopi rattler: an orange rattler crossing the path . . . . . . . . . .  Homing lizards: how do trunk-ground anoles find their way home? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Mata Mata . . . . . . . . . .  The yellow-spotted wolf snake: the krait mimic . . . . . . . . . .  New York anti-venom sharing program introduced . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Chuckwalla . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Into the Canadian Desert . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa Constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Earliest helmeted lizard lived in Wyoming rainforests . . . . . . . . . .  The search for the Utah night lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sunbeam Snake . . . . . . . . . .  A spotted leaf-toed gecko interrupts our tea break . . . . . . . . . .  150 year old Galapagos tortoise dies at the San Diego Zoo . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  A manageable mole snake . . . . . . . . . .  Researching iguanas, up close and personal . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Chuckwalla . . . . . . . . . .  "Missing link" to contemporary turtles found? . . . . . . . . . .  The Sri Lankan painted frog: the sad-face frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Russian Tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Snakes are just born that way . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bird Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Newquay Zoo home to UK's first baby black monitor lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Hog-nosed snake with a side of southern hospitality . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  USFWS reviewing 10 herps for Endangered Species listings . . . . . . . . . .  Encountering a reptilian monster: the saltwater crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  World's fourth two-headed bearded dragon born . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Leopard Frog Tadpole . . . . . . . . . .  The alligator snapper trio . . . . . . . . . .  Frog deaths in Lake Titicaca an ominous warning . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Box Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Florida plumber finds live iguana in toilet . . . . . . . . . .  Russell's viper: snake mama surprise . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Cuvier's dwarf caiman . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: How to train your (Komodo) dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Rough road herping: finding a rough earth snake . . . . . . . . . .  Leaping lesbian lizard is New Mexico's state lizard . . . . . . . . . .  CBD joins HSUS to jointly intervene in USARK lawsuit . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kimberly Rock Monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Wedding bells and sand snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Los Angeles zoo home to rare baby Gray's monitor lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frilled Dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Water snake glamor: shining in the lights . . . . . . . . . .  Over 150 new animal species identified in India . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Spencer's Monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Bacteria may be key to saving frogs from deadly fungus . . . . . . . . . .  Basking beauties: Himalayan rock agamas . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Justice Department returns leucistic boas to Brazil . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: A new Goanna in Kimberly . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gharial . . . . . . . . . .  The many patterns of the yellow rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Researchers are rediscovering amphibians long thought extinct . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hat tip to the green iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Offbeat turtle frogs march to their own drummer . . . . . . . . . .  Common Indian tree frog: The amphibian wandering on Indian trees . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Five-lined skink . . . . . . . . . .  Close call for rare pink iguanas after volcanic eruption . . . . . . . . . .  Mole Kingsnakes: becoming accustomed to failure . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eastern coachwhip . . . . . . . . . .  The Beddome’s keelback . . . . . . . . . .  "Sea turtle CSI" tracks loggerhead mothers . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Timber rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lansberg's hognosed pitviper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Fishing with snapping turtles . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Fishing with snapping turtles . . . . . . . . . .  Knight anole makes a happy home in Florida . . . . . . . . . .  Moving gopher tortoises proves costly for Florida community . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Harlequin toad . . . . . . . . . .  A cute juvenile Indian bullfrog from Western Ghats . . . . . . . . . .  Change.org petition asks green iguana be declared domesticated . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Elongated tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  Sweden-born crocodiles shipped to new home in Cuba . . . . . . . . . .  The search is on for a baby black caiman . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Banana pectinata . . . . . . . . . .  A friendly inhabitant of the Indian seas: The file snake . . . . . . . . . .  Uluru skinks don't kick kids out of the burrow . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Herping a creek bed . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: South American hognose . . . . . . . . . .  A message to Ohio's Governor Kasich from 'The Snake People' . . . . . . . . . .  Fumbled forecast and Strecker's chorus frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Can artificial insemination save the Yangtze softshell turtles? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Ringneck snake . . . . . . . . . .  Alligator shows truck and driver who's boss . . . . . . . . . .  An unexpected meeting with a termite hill gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hognose . . . . . . . . . .  An Ecuadorian frog in Peru . . . . . . . . . .  Zoo hopes to save Hellbender salamanders in Indiana . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Blind snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Can USFWS appeal the preliminary injunction and seek a stay? . . . . . . . . . .  The buff-stripped keelback . . . . . . . . . .  Unknown disease puts Australian turtle on the brink of extinction . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hognose . . . . . . . . . .  The Indian monitor lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Rhino iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Two Texas map turtles and not one camera . . . . . . . . . .  Windsor Humane Society investigating disturbing watersnake killing . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Desert horned lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Turtle reunited with her veteran savior . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Parson's chameleon . . . . . . . . . .  Zoo teaching grade schoolers to be citizen scientists . . . . . . . . . .  An arboreal beauty: the green tailed rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green tree monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Malabar gliding frog: A flying amphibian . . . . . . . . . .  When Prince Harry met lizard Harry . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tokay gecko . . . . . . . . . .  The injunction against USFWS: What you need to know now . . . . . . . . . .  The Ceylon cat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Crocodile dental care . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Arizona mountain kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Burrow borrowers: the blotched tiger salamander . . . . . . . . . .  First new rattlesnake antivenom in over a decade approved by FDA . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded Dragon . . . . . . . . . .  East meets west at the International Herpetological Symposium . . . . . . . . . .  Florida alligators are not getting enough food . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black milk snake . . . . . . . . . .  Endangered, tongueless frog bred in captivity for first time . . . . . . . . . .  Desperately seeking smooth green snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Okeetee corn snake . . . . . . . . . .  Will Florida see the return of green turtles? . . . . . . . . . .  A surprising rescue: Montane trinket snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Pine snake . . . . . . . . . .  Crested Geckos linked to Salmonella outbreak . . . . . . . . . .  White-lipped pit vipers rule the trees of northern India . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Flipping ringnecks . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tiger-leg monkey frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Brazilian Horned Frog: Reminiscences and hopes . . . . . . . . . .  New frogs carve their own sex caves . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Mitchell's reed frog . . . . . . . . . .  Tar threatens Malaysian sea turtle breeding grounds . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Common frog . . . . . . . . . .  Cancer claims NM herpetologist Charlie Painter . . . . . . . . . .  A Black Hills Venture: The search for a red-bellied snake . . . . . . . . . .  How much do you know about snakes? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Northern Leopard Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Indian rock python freaks out tea farmers . . . . . . . . . .  Retirees research climate change in the desert . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Pacific tree frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Venom extraction of king cobra . . . . . . . . . .  Meet kingsnake.com at the International Herp Symposium in San Antonio! . . . . . . . . . .  Red sand boa: A snake with two faces . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tegu . . . . . . . . . .  Warning for drivers in New England: Watch for frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Endangered but everywhere: Flattened musk turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Boy brings snake that bit him to the hospital . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded anole . . . . . . . . . .  Python climbs tree in captivating video . . . . . . . . . .  Limbless wonders: The Western legless lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Plumed basilisk . . . . . . . . . .  My first snake: The common trinket snake . . . . . . . . . .  Over 30,000 acres needed for tiger salamander recovery . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Roughneck monitor . . . . . . . . . .  The Southern copperhead: A marvel of camouflage . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Savu python . . . . . . . . . .  Gabon viper calls Angola home . . . . . . . . . .  Beware of dwarf caimans . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Coelen's python . . . . . . . . . .  River bath disturbance: Indian rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Florida "Python Patrol" met with criticism . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Blood python . . . . . . . . . .  Forest pitvipers: Well camouflaged or very rare? . . . . . . . . . .  Baby turtle in South Africa saved by little girls . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Moluccan python . . . . . . . . . .  The banded kukri snake . . . . . . . . . .  Poison dart frogs may generate aeroscience innovations . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green Tree Python . . . . . . . . . .  Hump-nosed pit viper: The lance-headed snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Saltwater crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  The incredible disappearing fer-de-lance . . . . . . . . . .  "Punk rock" frog can form spines on its skin . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Rio Cauca caecilian . . . . . . . . . .  China may have use for invasive Australian cane toads . . . . . . . . . .  Chicago Herpetological Society Meeting - July 29, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  SSAR 58th Meeting - July 30, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Repticon Nashville - Aug. 1-2, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Repticon Dallas - Aug. 1-2, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Jacksonville Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 01, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Hamburg Reptile Show - Aug. 01, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  SHS Los Angeles Meeting - Aug. 05, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Greater Cincinnati Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 05, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Central Illinois Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 06, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Calusa Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 06, 2015 . . . . . . . . . . 
follow us on facebook follow us on twitter follow us on YouTube link to us on LinkedIn

click to return to kingsnake.com index

The African Burrowing "Python"
(Calabaria reinhardtii)


Other Images


Other names

Calabaria, Calabar Python, West African Burrowing Python, Burrowing Python, West African Ground Python.

Most of these names suffer from the unfortunate use of the word "Python".   The relationship of these snakes to other Boids is a matter of some conjecture.   Some authors regard this snake as a Erycine, but the evidence for this is somewhat equivocal.   See the taxonomy page for a further discussion of Calabaria systematics.


Introduction

Calabaria are unusual snakes.   They are much more remniscent of a large Blind Snake (e.g. Typhlops, Leptotyphlops , etc.) than a boid.   Although this species has been associated with the Erycines since its description (it was actually described as a member of the genus Eryx by Schlegel in 1851), they are different from all other Erycines in that they are oviparous (= egg laying).   Because many of the characteristics they share with the Erycinae could be a result of sharing a fossorial (burrowing) lifestyle, their relationship to the Erycines (and boids in general) remains open for debate.

Adults rarely exceed 3 feet in length.   This snake is found in western tropical Africa, from Sierra Leone, east to northern Zaire.   It has been found in rocky secondary forest and overgrown plantations with dense undergrowth.   Several authors report finding the snake on the forest floor with some significant leaf cover.

It has been found on the ground and over 1 meter above the ground in small bushes or climbing on fallen logs.   Although it has been reported to be nocturnal, Gartlan and Struhsaker found several individuals actively foraging (and even eating) during the day.   There are records of activity from at least early September until late March.

Behavior

There is little published information on the behavior of wild Calabaria.   It has been observed to eat mice and has been found on several occasions raiding mouse nests.   These snakes are expert constrictors of small rodents and prefer them as food in captivity. They can easily constrict four or more nestlings at one time, a skill which is very useful to a potential nest robber.
This snake is famous for rolling in a ball when threatened.   The ball it rolls into is tight and the head is often, but not always, placed at the center of the ball.
It also has a curious habit of head faking with its tail.   When first disturbed, the snake will freeze, pressing its chin down firmly onto the ground.   Then it will lift its tail slightly and move it gently back and forth, like a head.   Considering how similar the head and tail of this species look, it is quite hard to tell which end is up!   Many specimens also have some white scales (or even a white band) around the base of the tail, further attracting attention to the false head.
Calabaria make no attempt to bite when handled.


Captive Maintenance

Calabaria are relatively easy snakes to keep in captivity if you are prepared to meet a few of their needs.   They are very shy snakes and require at least one (more is better) secure hide box.   They seem to prefer cramped hide boxes to roomy ones.   They do not require large enclosures (they have bred in ten gallon aquaria) but they do require constant access to clean water.   I have noticed they seem to "enjoy" having the cage misted once a week or so.

Feeding

Some imported Calabaria will take to pre-killed mice right from the start.   Females seem to be better about this than males. Others are a little more fussy.   They prefer small rodents and are particularly fond of fuzzy mouse and rat nestlings.   Some will refuse hopper mice, yet willingly take a rat fuzzy that is significantly larger!   They can usually be stimulated to feed by offering several smaller food items (i.e. a nest full of rodents).   Even a newly imported picky male can usually be tempted to eat by offering a clutch of rat or mouse fuzzies!
They will often take 4 or more fuzzy rats/mice in one feeding.   I have been able to stimulate the "nest robbing" reflex in shy Calabaria by offering one small fuzzy and then pressing a few others along the sides of the snake while it is subduing the first.   The snake's instinctive response is to try and press that "escaping" baby against the wall of the cage and hold it here until it is done with the first one.   Usually I can get a snake to take three or four mice at a feeding that way.

Captive Reproduction

Very few people have succesfully bred Calabaria in captivity.   A few people have successfully hatched eggs laid by wild caught gravid females.  For an excellent article on breeding Calabaria in captivity, see Rick Staub's article in the February 2001 Reptile and Amphibian Hobbyist (Vol. 6 No. 6).

Neil Chernoff has a fairly thorough discussion of his experience breeding Calabaria successfully for several years in a row.  He also has some other interesting comments about captive reproduction in reptiles, in general.  His page is an interesting read.

The following notes were sent to me by Neil regarding his successful reproduction of the species.   Neil feels that the key to reproducing these shy snakes may be in providing them ample food and water, plenty of hiding places, and otherwise leaving them alone.
His male was purchased in 1993 and his female in 1994.   They were kept in a ten gallon aquarium with a room temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit and a heat pad under one end of the cage.   The snakes reproduced in 1998.   Mating was not observed.   He noticed the female was very swollen towards the cloaca on June 9th.   He separated her into another cage and provided her with a laying box filled with a mix of sphagnum and peat moss.   This list includes some observations on the development and hatching of eggs

6/24 - Female laid 3 eggs.
6/25 - Total wt of eggs 181.2g (pre-laying wt of female 376.9).
Eggs were therefore 48% of pre-laying body weight(!).
6/26 - Moved to animal room, placed in dish on vermiculite per VPI suggestions.
Wt of eggs - 181.3g.
7/1 - Eggs - 182.2g small amount of water added to dish.
7/2 - Wt of eggs -182.7g.
7/6 - Wt of eggs -185.0 small amount of water added to dish.
7/9 - Wt of eggs -187.0
7/14 - Wt of eggs -189.7
7/22 - Wt of eggs -188.6 vermiculite dry, water added
7/24 - Wt of eggs -188.2
7/27 - Wt of eggs -187.4
7/29 - Wt of eggs -186.6
It appeared that the top egg was the most flaccid.   On the assumption that contact with the moist bedding was better for weight (and noting that the top eggs of the sinaloans were the most collapsed), I placed a three inch strip of moist toweling against the side of the top egg.
7/30 - Wt of eggs -186.2
7/31 - Wt of eggs -185.9
8/10 - One egg had slits and movement (the flaccid egg on top)
it had detached from the other pair. The remaining eggs have movement.
8/11 - Snake 2 emerged from the egg
placed in a cage with pine bedding and a water bowl.
Snake 2 weighed 32.5g.
8/12 - 2nd egg is slit.
8/13 - 2nd animal emerged from egg
placed in cage with pine shavings and water bowl
Snake weighed 32.2g.
Snake 1 ate a pinkie.
8/14 - Snake 2 ate pinkie.
8/17 - Third egg beginning to rot and discarded.

Since then, Snake #1 has eaten single pinkies on 8/21 and 8/25; snake #2 has eaten on 8/21 (did not eat on 8/25).   Neither snake ate on 8/26. Current (8/27) weights: snake 1 = 35.9g and snake 2 = 31.5g.

I am very greatful to Neil for providing me with this information!   Please see his web page for more information and data from subsequent breedings.


References

Chernoff, N.  1998. Notes on the captive reproduction in Calabaria. Personal communication.

Gartlan, J.S. and Struhsaker, T.T.  197?. Notes on the habits of the Calabar Ground Python (Calabaria reinhardtii Schlegel) in Cameroon, West Africa. British Journal of Herpetology ??:201-202. (I can't read the year on my copy. I will find the original and add it.)

Gray, J.E.  1858. Description of a new genus of Boidae from old Calabar, and a list of west African reptiles. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1858:154-167.

Kluge, A. G.  1993. Calabaria and the phylogeny of erycine snakes. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 107:293-351.

Schlegel, H.  1851. Description d'une nouvelle espèce du genre Eryx, Eryx reinhardtii. Bijdragen tot de Dierkunde, Amsterdam 1:1-3.

Staub, R.  2001.  The Calabar Burrowing Boa/Python.  Reptile and Amphibian Hobbyist 6(6): 34-41.

Villiers, A.  1963. Les Serpents de l'Ouest Africain. 2nd edition. Institut Français D'Afrique Noir. Dakar. pp. 91-92.

Welch, K.R.G.  1982. Herpetology of Africa: a checklist and bibiolography of the orders Amphisbaenia, Sauria, and Serpentes. Robert E. Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida.


Return to the Sand Boa Relatives Page
Return to the Sand Boa Page


© Chris Harrison

Sponsored Link

Click here for LLL Reptile & Supply
advertise here

Herp Events

Reptile and amphibian expos, symposiums, zoo and museum exhibitions and other educational events are great places to ask questions, get answers and network with other herp keepers.
Upcoming Reptile and Amphibian Events:
Submit a non-profit event - Purchase a commercial listing

New/Updated

Looking for a reptile or amphibian related business? A reptile store, breeder, importer, maunfacturer or supplier? Our business directory lists some of the most popluar herp businesses in the world.
Locate a reptile or amphibian business by name:
New
• Buy Dubia Roaches
• Reptile Rapture
• Backwater Reptiles
• Dubi Deli
• Steel City Reptile Expo
• Reptilinks Whole Prey
• BoaMorph.com
• Xtreme Exotics
• GeckoDaddy.com
• Northern Rodents
Updated
• Bushmasters Online(Ripa)
• Eden Reptiles
• PerfectPrey.com
• Underground Reptiles
• ECO WEAR & Publishing
• Wicked Pythons
• Backwater Reptiles
• Eublah Exotics
• Henry Piorun Reptiles
• South Texas Dragons
list your business on kingsnake.com

Video Gallery

Check out these reptile and amphibian submitted by staff, volunteers, and users of the kingsnake.com community. Our system supports videos hosted on YouTube. If you have a favorite YouTube video, please submit it here.

more videos       submit a video

Site Tools

Manage - manage your user and advertising accounts
Register For A User Account Click Here
Manage Your User Profile Click Here
Reset Your Password Click Here
Change Your Email Click Here
Manage Your Banner Account/View Stats Click Here
Manage Your Business Directory Listing Click Here
Mark Your Business Directory Listing As Updated Click Here
Manage Your Classified Account Click Here
Post A Classified Advertisement Click Here
Remove A Classified Advertisement Click Here
Purchase - advertising and services purchase quick links
Purchase a classified account$20.00-$85.00Click Here
Renew a classified account$20.00-$85.00Click Here
Upgrade to an enhanced classified$ variesClick Here
Purchase a business directory listing$150 a yearClick Here
Purchase a banner advertisement$ variesClick Here
Purchase a standard event listing$100 a listingClick Here
Pay an open invoice Click Here
Contact the sales department Click Here
Support - help, tips, & resources quick links
Classified Account Terms Of Service Click Here
Classified Help Click Here
Classified Tips Click Here
Classified Complaints Click Here
Banner Ad Help Click Here
DBA Search Click Here
Business Name Registration Verification Click Here
Are you registered? To advertise here using a business name you must have your legal business name registration verified. Click here for details on the program or to register your business FREE!

Glossary

Sites by OnlineHobbyist.com Inc:
kingsnake.com | NRAAC.ORG | ReptileBusinessGuide.com | ReptileShowGuide.com | ReptileShows.mobi | Connected By Cars | DesertRunner.org | Lizardkeepers | AprilFirstBioEngineering
GunHobbyist.com | GunShowGuide.com | GunShows.mobi | GunBusinessGuide.com | Music: club kingsnake | live stage magazine



powered by kingsnake.com
click here for Rodent Pro
pool banner - advertise here $50 year
click here for Rodent Pro
pool banner - $30 year
click here for Sunshine Chameleons
pool banner - $25 year
kingsnake.com® is a registered trademark of OnlineHobbyist.com, Inc.© 1997-
    - this site optimized for 1024x768 resolution -