click here for Rodent Pro
NEW! Text Ad! Your Text Ad Here!
contact jeffb@kingsnake.com for details
Locate a business by name: click to list your business
search the classifieds. buy an account
reptile events by zip code list an event
News & Events: The Southern copperhead: A marvel of camouflage . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Savu python . . . . . . . . . .  Gabon viper calls Angola home . . . . . . . . . .  Beware of dwarf caimans . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Coelen's python . . . . . . . . . .  River bath disturbance: Indian rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Florida "Python Patrol" met with criticism . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Blood python . . . . . . . . . .  Forest pitvipers: Well camouflaged or very rare? . . . . . . . . . .  Baby turtle in South Africa saved by little girls . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Moluccan python . . . . . . . . . .  The banded kukri snake . . . . . . . . . .  Poison dart frogs may generate aeroscience innovations . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green Tree Python . . . . . . . . . .  Hump-nosed pit viper: The lance-headed snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Saltwater crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  The incredible disappearing fer-de-lance . . . . . . . . . .  "Punk rock" frog can form spines on its skin . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Rio Cauca caecilian . . . . . . . . . .  China may have use for invasive Australian cane toads . . . . . . . . . .  Appreciating the corn snake in its natural form . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Reticulated collared lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Michigan holds first herp inventory . . . . . . . . . .  The hard-to-find glass lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Bamboo pit viper: The angry-looking serpent . . . . . . . . . .  Bitten by an exotic snake? Turn to the Dallas Zoo . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sulawesi forest turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Günther's racer: The tiny athlete . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Southern copperhead . . . . . . . . . .  You never forget your first scarlet kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Creating space for local newts in your own garden . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Speckled rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . .  The uncommon blue striped garter snake . . . . . . . . . .  Antivenom made from opossums may reduce cost of treating snake bites . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sidewinder . . . . . . . . . .  The color shifting whipsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Did primate vision develop to detect snakes? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Prairie rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . .  The common bronzeback tree snake . . . . . . . . . .  Paleontologist forces smugglers to plead guilty . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Western diamondback . . . . . . . . . .  Striped coral snake: A perfect example of nature's beauty . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: A boy and his pet . . . . . . . . . .  Simple steps can help nesting sea turtles survive . . . . . . . . . .  'Twas a great night for herping . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Double trouble . . . . . . . . . .  The unexpected Gulf Coast box turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Frogs from Madagascar immune to deadly fungus? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Reticulated python . . . . . . . . . .  Hiding in plain sight: The ocellated gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Dead python measuring 16 feet found in English canal . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Anaconda . . . . . . . . . .  USFWS refuses extension request on Lacey Act listing; USARK files for injunction . . . . . . . . . .  Black-and-white tegus exhibiting necrophilia . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Reticulated python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Coachwhip weekend . . . . . . . . . .  Students save snakes they've visited for years . . . . . . . . . .  Ashy Gecko: An elfin interloper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Milk snake beauty . . . . . . . . . .  Night of the siren . . . . . . . . . .  North Carolina volunteer program looking for herping help . . . . . . . . . .  USFWS seeks immediate ban on Mediterranean Geckos . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Parrot snake . . . . . . . . . .  Common sand boa: The fat-belly constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Axolotl are disappearing from their only habitat . . . . . . . . . .  Bright spot: beautiful Mexican wood turtles . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bull snake mama . . . . . . . . . .  Saw-scaled viper: The quick tiny striker . . . . . . . . . .  New insights on mass amphibian extinction . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hatchling hognose . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Panther chameleon . . . . . . . . . .  Lizard venom helps create new medicines . . . . . . . . . .  Somewhere and back again . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: William's day gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Common krait: The silent killer . . . . . . . . . .  Plastic bowls may save rainforest frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Crested gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Irwin family under fire for their questionable conservation work . . . . . . . . . .  Letting sleeping terrapins lie . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Western spiny-tailed skink . . . . . . . . . .  Eastern hognoses: Best actor in the reptile world . . . . . . . . . .  Conservation programs making things worse in Canberra? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Wonder gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Welcoming Phoenix . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Collared lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The surprising similarities of eastern coral snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Beautiful in sight and sound . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gopher snake . . . . . . . . . .  Relic leopard frog exposes challenges of conservation . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Rhino iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Green keelback: The nightmare of toads . . . . . . . . . .  Photographer of 'cowboy frog' image explains the stunning snapshot . . . . . . . . . .  The little frogs with big voices . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green tree python . . . . . . . . . .  Ornate Flying Snake: The wingless flying beauty . . . . . . . . . .  Bullets, bombs, and snake bites: Military duty is hazardous . . . . . . . . . .  UK volunteers prepping to keep toads safe from cars . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gaboon viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Elvis and Pricilla . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tinley Park NARBC 2011 . . . . . . . . . .  A cat that doesn’t meow: The common Indian cat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Trafficking ring that sold endangered species busted . . . . . . . . . .  The magnificent red snakes of the mangroves . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Oregon red spotted garter snake . . . . . . . . . .  Indian croc bank raises funds to expand, accommodate more visitors . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snapping turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Flat-tailed horned lizard granted temporary protected status . . . . . . . . . .  Looks can be deceiving when it comes to the leopard rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Australian water dragons . . . . . . . . . .  We need you to help giant snakes in need! . . . . . . . . . .  'Faster than the crack of any whip': The coachwhip . . . . . . . . . .  Men arrested using children's books to smuggle herps out of Australia . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Fire salamander . . . . . . . . . .  USFWS: Reticulated pythons, anacondas added to list; boa constrictors spared . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Turtle vs tomato . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Large-webbed bell toad . . . . . . . . . .  Report: USFWS to add boas, reticulated pythons, anacondas to invasive list . . . . . . . . . .  Key to fighting battlefield infections may be in alligator blood . . . . . . . . . .  The beautiful one hundred pace snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tiger salamander . . . . . . . . . .  WTF, Spring? Deals, deals, and more deals! . . . . . . . . . .  Nurseries for poison dart frogs dug by feral pigs . . . . . . . . . .  As spring approaches, herpers need to change gears . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gharials . . . . . . . . . .  Premiere UK athletic training ground lodge put on hold due to newts . . . . . . . . . .  Chicken turtles wander, but they aren't lost . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hatchling spiny turtle . . . . . . . . . .  For lizards it's not what you say, it's when you say it . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tegu . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Bushveld rain frog feeding . . . . . . . . . .  Should reptile shows be legal in the U.K.? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Wood turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Raise your glass lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Ancient "dinosaur cousin" remains found in Israel . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eyelash viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Garter snake . . . . . . . . . .  Vine snake: The hidden predator . . . . . . . . . .  Inner workings of redtail coral venom finally discovered . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Leopard gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Blue, orange, and beautiful . . . . . . . . . .  Surprise new frog discovered in Peru . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gray tree frog . . . . . . . . . .  Checkered keelback: The serpentine mermaid . . . . . . . . . .  Conjoined lizard twins found at German zoo . . . . . . . . . .  kingsnake.com launches new Classified Vendor Directory . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Hatching bearded dragons . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Smoky jungle frog in the darkness . . . . . . . . . .  Australian police station doubles as lizard home . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sand boa . . . . . . . . . .  Lizard politics cost USFW agent his job . . . . . . . . . .  That underrated amphibian, the infamous caecilian . . . . . . . . . .  Hunting season could destabilize alligator population . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Copperhead . . . . . . . . . .  Mistaken for a Kanburian bamboo viper . . . . . . . . . .  Godzilla stolen, then returned . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Baby radiated tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  The beauty of a northern red salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Kite surfer saves loggerhead turtle from plastic net . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Fire salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Love the one you're with! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kenyan sand boa . . . . . . . . . .  Baby gopher tortoise jackpot . . . . . . . . . .  World's deadliest library being created in Australia . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frilled dragon . . . . . . . . . .  HSUS and dangerous wild animal laws . . . . . . . . . .  Rainbow boa stolen on school's snow day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Baby Galapagos tortoises . . . . . . . . . .  The coquis call says it all . . . . . . . . . .  Carpet python eats possum dinner hanging upside down . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: The rubber eel . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Amazing Macklot's python . . . . . . . . . .  The coral snake mimicker . . . . . . . . . .  Fossilized mama reptile shown caring for babies . . . . . . . . . .  After year and a half, more details emerge on tragedy in Campbellton . . . . . . . . . .  kingsnake.com turns 18 today! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black Mangrove! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Buddy's Life Story! . . . . . . . . . .  New European animal laws worry UK hobbyists . . . . . . . . . .  Hide and seek with a greenhouse frog . . . . . . . . . .  Snakebite victim saved by stormtrooper suit . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Skink! . . . . . . . . . .  Effort to make salamander Idaho's state amphibian fails . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Collared Lizard! . . . . . . . . . .  The call of the Florida gopher frog . . . . . . . . . .  Sri Lankan snake's discovery in India suggests ancient ties between countries . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Biak Green Tree Python! . . . . . . . . . .  What makes India the land of the cobra . . . . . . . . . .  A queen snake and a surprising find . . . . . . . . . .  Western pond turtles disappearing from Oregon . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Reticulated Python! . . . . . . . . . .  India's best wall-climbing snake is also its cutest . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Rabbit VS Snake! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Vinales Anole! . . . . . . . . . .  Hatchet-faced treefrogs are just right . . . . . . . . . .  Girl pushes for bill to name Idaho state amphibian . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: White's Tree Frog! . . . . . . . . . .  Vietnam home to new tree frog species . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Sarasota - May 9, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Bristol VA - May 09, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Indiana Reptile Show - May 9, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  All Maryland Reptile Show - May 09, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Steel City Reptile Expo - May 16, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Rocky Mountain Reptile Expo - May 16, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Repticon West Palm Beach - May 16-17, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Repticon Augusta - May 16-17, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  NorCal Reptile Expo - May 16-17, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Hudson Valley Reptile Expo - May 17, 2015 . . . . . . . . . . 
follow us on facebook follow us on twitter follow us on YouTube link to us on LinkedIn follow us on kingsnake connect

click to return to kingsnake.com index

The African Burrowing "Python"
(Calabaria reinhardtii)


Other Images


Other names

Calabaria, Calabar Python, West African Burrowing Python, Burrowing Python, West African Ground Python.

Most of these names suffer from the unfortunate use of the word "Python".   The relationship of these snakes to other Boids is a matter of some conjecture.   Some authors regard this snake as a Erycine, but the evidence for this is somewhat equivocal.   See the taxonomy page for a further discussion of Calabaria systematics.


Introduction

Calabaria are unusual snakes.   They are much more remniscent of a large Blind Snake (e.g. Typhlops, Leptotyphlops , etc.) than a boid.   Although this species has been associated with the Erycines since its description (it was actually described as a member of the genus Eryx by Schlegel in 1851), they are different from all other Erycines in that they are oviparous (= egg laying).   Because many of the characteristics they share with the Erycinae could be a result of sharing a fossorial (burrowing) lifestyle, their relationship to the Erycines (and boids in general) remains open for debate.

Adults rarely exceed 3 feet in length.   This snake is found in western tropical Africa, from Sierra Leone, east to northern Zaire.   It has been found in rocky secondary forest and overgrown plantations with dense undergrowth.   Several authors report finding the snake on the forest floor with some significant leaf cover.

It has been found on the ground and over 1 meter above the ground in small bushes or climbing on fallen logs.   Although it has been reported to be nocturnal, Gartlan and Struhsaker found several individuals actively foraging (and even eating) during the day.   There are records of activity from at least early September until late March.

Behavior

There is little published information on the behavior of wild Calabaria.   It has been observed to eat mice and has been found on several occasions raiding mouse nests.   These snakes are expert constrictors of small rodents and prefer them as food in captivity. They can easily constrict four or more nestlings at one time, a skill which is very useful to a potential nest robber.
This snake is famous for rolling in a ball when threatened.   The ball it rolls into is tight and the head is often, but not always, placed at the center of the ball.
It also has a curious habit of head faking with its tail.   When first disturbed, the snake will freeze, pressing its chin down firmly onto the ground.   Then it will lift its tail slightly and move it gently back and forth, like a head.   Considering how similar the head and tail of this species look, it is quite hard to tell which end is up!   Many specimens also have some white scales (or even a white band) around the base of the tail, further attracting attention to the false head.
Calabaria make no attempt to bite when handled.


Captive Maintenance

Calabaria are relatively easy snakes to keep in captivity if you are prepared to meet a few of their needs.   They are very shy snakes and require at least one (more is better) secure hide box.   They seem to prefer cramped hide boxes to roomy ones.   They do not require large enclosures (they have bred in ten gallon aquaria) but they do require constant access to clean water.   I have noticed they seem to "enjoy" having the cage misted once a week or so.

Feeding

Some imported Calabaria will take to pre-killed mice right from the start.   Females seem to be better about this than males. Others are a little more fussy.   They prefer small rodents and are particularly fond of fuzzy mouse and rat nestlings.   Some will refuse hopper mice, yet willingly take a rat fuzzy that is significantly larger!   They can usually be stimulated to feed by offering several smaller food items (i.e. a nest full of rodents).   Even a newly imported picky male can usually be tempted to eat by offering a clutch of rat or mouse fuzzies!
They will often take 4 or more fuzzy rats/mice in one feeding.   I have been able to stimulate the "nest robbing" reflex in shy Calabaria by offering one small fuzzy and then pressing a few others along the sides of the snake while it is subduing the first.   The snake's instinctive response is to try and press that "escaping" baby against the wall of the cage and hold it here until it is done with the first one.   Usually I can get a snake to take three or four mice at a feeding that way.

Captive Reproduction

Very few people have succesfully bred Calabaria in captivity.   A few people have successfully hatched eggs laid by wild caught gravid females.  For an excellent article on breeding Calabaria in captivity, see Rick Staub's article in the February 2001 Reptile and Amphibian Hobbyist (Vol. 6 No. 6).

Neil Chernoff has a fairly thorough discussion of his experience breeding Calabaria successfully for several years in a row.  He also has some other interesting comments about captive reproduction in reptiles, in general.  His page is an interesting read.

The following notes were sent to me by Neil regarding his successful reproduction of the species.   Neil feels that the key to reproducing these shy snakes may be in providing them ample food and water, plenty of hiding places, and otherwise leaving them alone.
His male was purchased in 1993 and his female in 1994.   They were kept in a ten gallon aquarium with a room temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit and a heat pad under one end of the cage.   The snakes reproduced in 1998.   Mating was not observed.   He noticed the female was very swollen towards the cloaca on June 9th.   He separated her into another cage and provided her with a laying box filled with a mix of sphagnum and peat moss.   This list includes some observations on the development and hatching of eggs

6/24 - Female laid 3 eggs.
6/25 - Total wt of eggs 181.2g (pre-laying wt of female 376.9).
Eggs were therefore 48% of pre-laying body weight(!).
6/26 - Moved to animal room, placed in dish on vermiculite per VPI suggestions.
Wt of eggs - 181.3g.
7/1 - Eggs - 182.2g small amount of water added to dish.
7/2 - Wt of eggs -182.7g.
7/6 - Wt of eggs -185.0 small amount of water added to dish.
7/9 - Wt of eggs -187.0
7/14 - Wt of eggs -189.7
7/22 - Wt of eggs -188.6 vermiculite dry, water added
7/24 - Wt of eggs -188.2
7/27 - Wt of eggs -187.4
7/29 - Wt of eggs -186.6
It appeared that the top egg was the most flaccid.   On the assumption that contact with the moist bedding was better for weight (and noting that the top eggs of the sinaloans were the most collapsed), I placed a three inch strip of moist toweling against the side of the top egg.
7/30 - Wt of eggs -186.2
7/31 - Wt of eggs -185.9
8/10 - One egg had slits and movement (the flaccid egg on top)
it had detached from the other pair. The remaining eggs have movement.
8/11 - Snake 2 emerged from the egg
placed in a cage with pine bedding and a water bowl.
Snake 2 weighed 32.5g.
8/12 - 2nd egg is slit.
8/13 - 2nd animal emerged from egg
placed in cage with pine shavings and water bowl
Snake weighed 32.2g.
Snake 1 ate a pinkie.
8/14 - Snake 2 ate pinkie.
8/17 - Third egg beginning to rot and discarded.

Since then, Snake #1 has eaten single pinkies on 8/21 and 8/25; snake #2 has eaten on 8/21 (did not eat on 8/25).   Neither snake ate on 8/26. Current (8/27) weights: snake 1 = 35.9g and snake 2 = 31.5g.

I am very greatful to Neil for providing me with this information!   Please see his web page for more information and data from subsequent breedings.


References

Chernoff, N.  1998. Notes on the captive reproduction in Calabaria. Personal communication.

Gartlan, J.S. and Struhsaker, T.T.  197?. Notes on the habits of the Calabar Ground Python (Calabaria reinhardtii Schlegel) in Cameroon, West Africa. British Journal of Herpetology ??:201-202. (I can't read the year on my copy. I will find the original and add it.)

Gray, J.E.  1858. Description of a new genus of Boidae from old Calabar, and a list of west African reptiles. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1858:154-167.

Kluge, A. G.  1993. Calabaria and the phylogeny of erycine snakes. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 107:293-351.

Schlegel, H.  1851. Description d'une nouvelle espèce du genre Eryx, Eryx reinhardtii. Bijdragen tot de Dierkunde, Amsterdam 1:1-3.

Staub, R.  2001.  The Calabar Burrowing Boa/Python.  Reptile and Amphibian Hobbyist 6(6): 34-41.

Villiers, A.  1963. Les Serpents de l'Ouest Africain. 2nd edition. Institut Français D'Afrique Noir. Dakar. pp. 91-92.

Welch, K.R.G.  1982. Herpetology of Africa: a checklist and bibiolography of the orders Amphisbaenia, Sauria, and Serpentes. Robert E. Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida.


Return to the Sand Boa Relatives Page
Return to the Sand Boa Page


© Chris Harrison

Sponsored Link

advertise here

Herp Events

Reptile and amphibian expos, symposiums, zoo and museum exhibitions and other educational events are great places to ask questions, get answers and network with other herp keepers.
Upcoming Reptile and Amphibian Events:
Submit a non-profit event - Purchase a commercial listing

Photo Gallery

Our gallery allows registered users to upload their favorite reptile and amphibian photos to the topic galleries and personal photos to the member galleries. Photos can be used on our forums, classifieds, and Connect, or shared with friends and family.

more photos   upload a photo

snakes
lizards
amphibians
chelonians
crocodilians
venomous

New/Updated

Looking for a reptile or amphibian related business? A reptile store, breeder, importer, maunfacturer or supplier? Our business directory lists some of the most popluar herp businesses in the world.
Locate a reptile or amphibian business by name:
New
 - Steel City Reptile Expo
 - Reptilinks Whole Prey
 - BoaMorph.com
 - Xtreme Exotics
 - GeckoDaddy.com
 - Northern Rodents
 - Wicked Leos
 - RepStylin
 - Cold Blooded Encounters
 - Captive Bred Excellence
Updated
 - The Bean Farm
 - South Texas Dragons
 - Eden Reptiles
 - Herp World Expo
 - Vision Products
 - Shores Enuff Snakes
 - Northwest Zoological Supply
 - Living Art Reptiles
 - RepStylin
 - Mice Direct
list your business on kingsnake.com

Connect

kingsnake.com's Connect is a beta project being developed to let the herp community stay in touch with their friends and fellow hobbyists, keep each other up to date on legislative issues as they develop, and to build and strengthen the herp community network. Registered users of kingsnake.com can use it to share photos, links, information, alerts, updates and more.
log in   find connections





Video Gallery

Check out these reptile and amphibian submitted by staff, volunteers, and users of the kingsnake.com community. Our system supports videos hosted on YouTube. If you have a favorite YouTube video, please submit it here.

more videos       submit a video

Site Tools

Manage - manage your user and advertising accounts
Register For A User Account Click Here
Manage Your User Profile Click Here
Reset Your Password Click Here
Change Your Email Click Here
Manage Your Banner Account/View Stats Click Here
Manage Your Business Directory Listing Click Here
Mark Your Business Directory Listing As Updated Click Here
Manage Your Classified Account Click Here
Post A Classified Advertisement Click Here
Remove A Classified Advertisement Click Here
Purchase - advertising and services purchase quick links
Purchase a classified account$20.00-$85.00Click Here
Renew a classified account$20.00-$85.00Click Here
Upgrade to an enhanced classified$ variesClick Here
Purchase a business directory listing$150 a yearClick Here
Purchase a banner advertisement$ variesClick Here
Purchase a standard event listing$100 a listingClick Here
Pay an open invoice Click Here
Contact the sales department Click Here
Support - help, tips, & resources quick links
Classified Account Terms Of Service Click Here
Classified Help Click Here
Classified Tips Click Here
Classified Complaints Click Here
Banner Ad Help Click Here
DBA Search Click Here
Business Name Registration Verification Click Here
Are you registered? To advertise here using a business name you must have your legal business name registration verified. Click here for details on the program or to register your business FREE!

Glossary