return to main index

  mobile - desktop
follow us on facebook follow us on twitter follow us on YouTube link to us on LinkedIn
 
Click here for Bion Terrarium Center
Mealworms, Crickets, Dubia, More...
Available Now at New York Worms!
Locate a business by name: click to list your business
search the classifieds. buy an account
events by zip code list an event
Search the forums             Search in:
News & Events: Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  The Reddest of the Reds . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  The Reddest of the Reds . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Speckled Racer . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Anacondas born by virgin birth . . . . . . . . . .  Anacondas born by virgin birth . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Egyptian Tortoises . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Beautiful Search . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Snakey Kind of Evening . . . . . . . . . .  In Memoriam: Jim Fowler . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Common Map Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  The Rich mountain salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Alligator . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Earth Day! . . . . . . . . . .  Come and Meet Bob. . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  To Cuba, Again . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Happy National Pet Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Turnip-tailed Agamas . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Southern Chorus Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Blackie’s Back . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Kirtland’s Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Barking, Biting, Brazilian Horned Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  The Variable Bush Viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Anaconda . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Tiger Salamanders . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy World Croc Day! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Newt . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Toad . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Romance is Ribbiting for Romeo and Juliet . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Snake of Many Colors, The Eyelashed Pit Viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  It’s a What? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Ringed Salamanders . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Grotto Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Toad . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Our First Red Pygmy . . . . . . . . . .  Toads Catch Unusual Lift . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Axolotl . . . . . . . . . .  Man vs crickets: final battle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Memories . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  There’s a New Gecko in Town! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Caecilian . . . . . . . . . .  Those “Little Green Turtles” . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Okeetee Corn . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Toad . . . . . . . . . .  Florida Leopard Frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Carpenters, Copperheads and Pygmys . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Caiman . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  More Non-native Anoles: Marie Galante Sail-tailed, Jamaican Giant, and Knight An... . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Nocturnal visitor causes havoc at Alligator Farm . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Canefield Kings . . . . . . . . . .  Pennsylvania’s alligator invasion . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  2018 Herp Symposium Live blog Day 1 . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Newt . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Port St. Lucie, - June 15, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Mobile - June 15-16, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Denver - June 15-16, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  DFW Herpetolocial Society Meeting - June 15, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Edmonton Reptile & Amphibian Society Mee - June 18, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  MAHS Fox Valley Meeting - June 21, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Suncoast Herp Society Meeting - June 22, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Salisbury - June 22-23, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Memphis - June 22-23, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Kissimmee - June 22-23, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . 
kingsnake.com - Reptile & Amphibian Encylopedia
"Vipera ammodytes"

Vipera ammodytes. (2010, January 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:49, January 27, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vipera_ammodytes&oldid=338984000

Vipera ammodytes is a venomous viper species found in southern Europe through to the Balkans and parts of the Middle East. It is reputed to be the most dangerous of the European vipers due to its large size, long fangs (up to 13 mm) and high venom toxicity.[3] The specific name is derived from the Greek words ammos and dutes, meaning "sand" and "burrower" or "diver"; not a very good name for an animal that actually prefers rocky habitats.[4] Five subspecies are currently recognized, including the nominate subspecies described here.[5]

Grows to a maximum length of 95 cm (37.62 in), although individuals usually measure less than 85 cm (33.66 in). Females are somewhat smaller than males. Maximum length also depends on race, with northern forms distinctly larger than southern ones.[3] According to Strugariu (2006), the average length is 50-70 cm (20 to 28 in) with reports of specimens over 1 m (40 in) in length. Females are usually larger and more heavily built, although the largest specimens on record are males.[6]

The head is covered in small, irregular scales that are either smooth or only weakly keeled, except for a pair of large supraocular scales that extend beyond the posterior margin of the eye. 10-13 small scaled border the eye and two rows separate the eye from the supralabials. The nasal scale is large, single (rarely divided) and separated from the rostral by a single nasorostral scale. The rostral scale is wider than it is long.[3]

The most distinctive characteristic is a single "horn" on the snout, just above the rostral scale. It consists of 9-17 scales arranged in 2 (rarely 2 or 4) transverse rows.[3] It grows to a length of about 5 mm and is actually soft and flexible. In southern subspecies, the horn sits vertically upright, while in V. a. ammodytes it points diagonally forward.[2]

The body is covered with strongly keeled dorsal scales in 21 or 23 rows (rarely 25) mid-body. The scales bordering the ventrals are smooth or weakly keeled. Males have 133-161 ventral scales and 27-46 paired subcaudals. Females have 135-164 and 24-38 respectively. The anal scale is single.[3]

The color pattern is different for males and females. In males, the head has irregular dark brown, dark gray or black markings. A thick, black stripe runs from behind the eye to behind the angle of the jaw. The tongue is usually black and the iris has a golden or coppery color. Males have a characteristic dark blotch or V marking on the back of the head that often connects to the dorsal zigzag pattern. The ground color for males varies and includes many different shades of grey, sometimes yellowish or pinkish grey, or yellowish brown. The dorsal zigzag is dark grey or black, the edge of which is sometimes darker. A row of indistinct, dark (occasionally yellowish) spots runs along each side, sometimes joined in a wavy band.[3]

Females have a similar color pattern, except that it is less distinct and contrasting. They usually lack the dark blotch or V marking on the back of the head that the males have. Ground color is variable and tends more towards browns and bronzes, such as grayish brown, reddish brown, copper, "dirty cream", or brick red. The dorsal zigzag is a shade of brown.[3]

Both sexes have a zigzag dorsal stripe set against a lighter background. This pattern is often fragmented. The belly color varies and can be grayish, yellowish brown, or pinkish, "heavily clouded" with dark spots. Sometimes the ventral color is black or bluish gray with white flecks and inclusions edged in white. The chin is lighter in color than the belly. Underneath, the tip of the tail may be yellow, orange, orange-red, red or green. Melanism does occur, but is rare. Juvenile color patterns are about the same as the adults.[3]

Horned viper, long-nosed viper, nose-horned viper, sand viper,[2] sand adder, common sand adder, common sand viper,[7] sand natter.[8]

North-eastern Italy, southern Slovakia, western Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, Republic of Macedonia, Greece (including Greek Macedonia and Cyclades), Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Georgia and Syria. The type locality is listed as "Oriente." Schwartz (1936) proposed that the type locality be restricted to "Zara" (Zadar, Croatia).[1]

Mertens & Wermuth (1960) also mention Austria as being part of the range of this species.[3]

This species is listed as strictly protected (Appendix II) under the Berne Convention.[9]

The common name sand viper is misleading, as this species does not occur in really sandy areas.[10] Mainly, it inhabits dry, rocky hillsides with sparse vegetation. Not usually associated with woodlands, but if so it will be found there around the edges and in clearings. Sometimes found in areas of human habitation, such as railway embankments, farmland, and especially vineyards if rubble piles and stone walls are present. May be found above 2000 m at lower latitudes.[3]

This species has no particular preference for its daily activity period. At higher altitudes, it is more active during the day. At lower altitudes, it may be found at any time of the day, becoming increasingly nocturnal as daytime temperatures rise.[3]

Despite its reputation, this species is generally lethargic, not at all aggressive, and tends not to bite without considerable provocation. If surprised, wild specimens may react in a number of different ways. Some remain motionless and hiss loudly, some hiss and then flee, while still others will attempt to bite immediately.[3]

V. ammodytes hibernates in the winter for a period of 2 to 6 months depending on environmental conditions.[6]

Primarily feeds on small mammals and birds. Juveniles apparently prefer lizards. Feeding behavior is influenced by prey size. Larger prey are struck, released, tracked and swallowed, while smaller prey is swallowed without using the venom apparatus. Occasionally, other snakes are eaten.[3] There are also reports of cannibalism.[6]

Before mating, the males of this species will engage an a combat dance, similar to adders.[3] Mating takes place in the spring (April-May) and between one and twenty live young are born in August-October. At birth, juveniles are 14-24 cm long.[6] This species is ovoviviparous.[11]

This species has often been kept in captivity and bred successfully.[3] It tolerates captivity much better than other European vipers, thriving in most surroundings and usually takes food easily from the start.[11] However, as far as handling is concerned, despite its relatively placid reputation, pinning and necking this snake can be risky, as they are relatively strong and can unexpectedly jerk free from a keeper's grasp. For close examinations, it is therefore advisable to use a clear plastic restraining tube instead.[6]

This is the largest and likely the most dangerous snake to be found in mainland Europe. In some areas it is at least a significant medical risk; in the past fatalities were relatively frequent in the Balkans because the peasants there had a habit of walking barefoot.[2]

The venom can be quite toxic, but varies over time and among different populations.[3] Brown (1973) gives an LD50 for mice of 1.2 mg/kg IV, 1.5 mg/kg IP and 2.0 mg/kg SC.[12] Novak et al. (1973) give ranges of 0.44-0.82 mg/kg and IV and 0.19-0.64 mg/kg IP. Minton (1974) states 6.6 mg/kg SC.[3]

The venom has both proteolytic and neurotoxic components and contains hemotoxins with blood coagulant properties, similar to and as powerful as in crotalid venom. Other properties include anticoagulant effects, hemoconcentration and hemorrhage. Bites promote symptoms typical of viperid envenomation, such as pain, swelling and discoloration, all of which may be immediate. There are also reports of dizziness and tingling.[3]

Humans respond rapidly to this venom, as do mice and birds. Lizards are less affected, while amphibians may even survive a bite. European snakes, such as Coronella and Natrix, are possibly immune.[3]

V. ammodytes venom is used in the production of antivenin for the bite of other European vipers and the snake is farmed for this purpose.[11][7]

This species was originally described by Linnaeus in Systema Naturae in 1758. Subsequently, Boulenger described a number of subspecies in the early 20th century that are still mostly recognized today. However, there are many alternative taxonomies.[3] One additional subspecies that may be encountered in literature is V. a. ruffoi (Bruno, 1968),[3] found in the Alpine region of Italy. However, many consider both ruffoi and gregorwalineri to be synonymous with V. a. ammodytes[6] and the taxon transcaucasiana to be a separate species.[6][3]

Vipera ammodytes. (2010, January 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:49, January 27, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vipera_ammodytes&oldid=338984000

This article has been read 316 times.
Sponsored Link
advertise here

New & Updated Business Listings

Looking for a reptile or amphibian related business? A reptile store, breeder, importer, maunfacturer or supplier? Our business directory lists some of the most popluar herp businesses in the world.
Locate a reptile or amphibian business by name:
New
• Scales and Tails of Ohio
• Snakes at Sunset
• Reptile Family Expo Lebanon...
• Backwater Reptiles
• ReptMart
• CrestedGeckos.com
• IndoReptile.com
• Jungle Bob's Reptile World
• FlChams
• Patrick Flanigan, Esquire -...
Updated
• Reptile Super Show
• Underground Reptiles
• Jungle Bob's Reptile World
• SerpentsOnline.com
• The Bean Farm
• Exotic Pets Las Vegas
• Northwest Zoological Supply
• FlChams
• Leopardgecko.com - Ron Trem...
• Trempers Lizard Ranch
list your business on kingsnake.com

Banner Pool

Click here for Freedom Breeder Cages
$100.year special flat rate banner! - click for info


  Search reptile or amphibian businesses by keyword:   search the classifieds. buy an account
state/province law database
search the forums.
search in: