mobile - desktop
 
Click here for LLL Reptile & Supply

follow us on facebook follow us on twitter follow us on YouTube link to us on LinkedIn
Locate a business by name: click to list your business
search the classifieds. buy an account
reptile events by zip code list an event
News & Events: Wildlife photographer captures moment snake swallows lizard whole . . . . . . . . . .  The Wall’s sind krait: A yellow-lipped black beauty . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Cunningham skink . . . . . . . . . .  Sea turtles in grave danger due to rising sea levels . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snapping Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  The Arizona treefrog . . . . . . . . . .  Endangered iguanas thriving on island of Monuriki . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa Constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Australian Water Dragon . . . . . . . . . .  The Whitaker’s Boa: The common crossbreed snake of India . . . . . . . . . .  Eastern indigo snakes heading back to native range . . . . . . . . . .  The Colorado Wood Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Is antivenin manufacturer ripping off snakebite victims? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eastern Garter Snake . . . . . . . . . .  This snake's feet weren't made for walking . . . . . . . . . .  Forsten’s Cat Snake: The big guy in the cat snake family . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Panther Chameleon . . . . . . . . . .  No babies yet for last female turtle of her species . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Asian Vine Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Loggerheads: Don't try this at home! . . . . . . . . . .  Mid-Kansas Herping . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eastern Box Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  A frog's best defense may threaten its future . . . . . . . . . .  My reptile management lecture ends up with the best audience . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Cat Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Man shot with his own gun while trying to protect sea turtle babies . . . . . . . . . .  Camouflaged tortoises, hiding in plain sight . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black Headed Python . . . . . . . . . .  Slender Coral Snake: The shy-natured venomous snake . . . . . . . . . .  British herpers asked to stop flipping tin . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Copperhead . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sulawesi Forest Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  The Bruni dump: one man's trash is a herper's treasure . . . . . . . . . .  Celebrate the snake on World Snake Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Drymarchon . . . . . . . . . .  Fangs like a weapon: the variegated kukri . . . . . . . . . .  Blanding's turtles may gain protection as endangered species . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Hopi rattler: an orange rattler crossing the path . . . . . . . . . .  Homing lizards: how do trunk-ground anoles find their way home? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Mata Mata . . . . . . . . . .  The yellow-spotted wolf snake: the krait mimic . . . . . . . . . .  New York anti-venom sharing program introduced . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Chuckwalla . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Into the Canadian Desert . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa Constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Earliest helmeted lizard lived in Wyoming rainforests . . . . . . . . . .  The search for the Utah night lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Sunbeam Snake . . . . . . . . . .  A spotted leaf-toed gecko interrupts our tea break . . . . . . . . . .  150 year old Galapagos tortoise dies at the San Diego Zoo . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  A manageable mole snake . . . . . . . . . .  Researching iguanas, up close and personal . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Chuckwalla . . . . . . . . . .  "Missing link" to contemporary turtles found? . . . . . . . . . .  The Sri Lankan painted frog: the sad-face frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Russian Tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the week: Snakes are just born that way . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bird Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Newquay Zoo home to UK's first baby black monitor lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Hog-nosed snake with a side of southern hospitality . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  USFWS reviewing 10 herps for Endangered Species listings . . . . . . . . . .  Encountering a reptilian monster: the saltwater crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  World's fourth two-headed bearded dragon born . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Leopard Frog Tadpole . . . . . . . . . .  The alligator snapper trio . . . . . . . . . .  Frog deaths in Lake Titicaca an ominous warning . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Box Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Florida plumber finds live iguana in toilet . . . . . . . . . .  Russell's viper: snake mama surprise . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Cuvier's dwarf caiman . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: How to train your (Komodo) dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Rough road herping: finding a rough earth snake . . . . . . . . . .  Leaping lesbian lizard is New Mexico's state lizard . . . . . . . . . .  CBD joins HSUS to jointly intervene in USARK lawsuit . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kimberly Rock Monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Wedding bells and sand snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Los Angeles zoo home to rare baby Gray's monitor lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frilled Dragon . . . . . . . . . .  Water snake glamor: shining in the lights . . . . . . . . . .  Over 150 new animal species identified in India . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Spencer's Monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Bacteria may be key to saving frogs from deadly fungus . . . . . . . . . .  Basking beauties: Himalayan rock agamas . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Justice Department returns leucistic boas to Brazil . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: A new Goanna in Kimberly . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gharial . . . . . . . . . .  The many patterns of the yellow rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Researchers are rediscovering amphibians long thought extinct . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hat tip to the green iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Offbeat turtle frogs march to their own drummer . . . . . . . . . .  Common Indian tree frog: The amphibian wandering on Indian trees . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Five-lined skink . . . . . . . . . .  Close call for rare pink iguanas after volcanic eruption . . . . . . . . . .  Mole Kingsnakes: becoming accustomed to failure . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Eastern coachwhip . . . . . . . . . .  The Beddome’s keelback . . . . . . . . . .  "Sea turtle CSI" tracks loggerhead mothers . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Timber rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lansberg's hognosed pitviper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Fishing with snapping turtles . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Fishing with snapping turtles . . . . . . . . . .  Knight anole makes a happy home in Florida . . . . . . . . . .  Moving gopher tortoises proves costly for Florida community . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Harlequin toad . . . . . . . . . .  A cute juvenile Indian bullfrog from Western Ghats . . . . . . . . . .  Change.org petition asks green iguana be declared domesticated . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Elongated tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  Sweden-born crocodiles shipped to new home in Cuba . . . . . . . . . .  The search is on for a baby black caiman . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Banana pectinata . . . . . . . . . .  A friendly inhabitant of the Indian seas: The file snake . . . . . . . . . .  Uluru skinks don't kick kids out of the burrow . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa constrictor . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Herping a creek bed . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: South American hognose . . . . . . . . . .  A message to Ohio's Governor Kasich from 'The Snake People' . . . . . . . . . .  Fumbled forecast and Strecker's chorus frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Can artificial insemination save the Yangtze softshell turtles? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Ringneck snake . . . . . . . . . .  Alligator shows truck and driver who's boss . . . . . . . . . .  An unexpected meeting with a termite hill gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hognose . . . . . . . . . .  An Ecuadorian frog in Peru . . . . . . . . . .  Zoo hopes to save Hellbender salamanders in Indiana . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Blind snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Can USFWS appeal the preliminary injunction and seek a stay? . . . . . . . . . .  The buff-stripped keelback . . . . . . . . . .  Unknown disease puts Australian turtle on the brink of extinction . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Hognose . . . . . . . . . .  The Indian monitor lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Rhino iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Two Texas map turtles and not one camera . . . . . . . . . .  Windsor Humane Society investigating disturbing watersnake killing . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Desert horned lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Turtle reunited with her veteran savior . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Parson's chameleon . . . . . . . . . .  Zoo teaching grade schoolers to be citizen scientists . . . . . . . . . .  An arboreal beauty: the green tailed rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Green tree monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Malabar gliding frog: A flying amphibian . . . . . . . . . .  When Prince Harry met lizard Harry . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tokay gecko . . . . . . . . . .  The injunction against USFWS: What you need to know now . . . . . . . . . .  The Ceylon cat snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Crocodile dental care . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Arizona mountain kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Burrow borrowers: the blotched tiger salamander . . . . . . . . . .  First new rattlesnake antivenom in over a decade approved by FDA . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded Dragon . . . . . . . . . .  East meets west at the International Herpetological Symposium . . . . . . . . . .  Florida alligators are not getting enough food . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Black milk snake . . . . . . . . . .  Endangered, tongueless frog bred in captivity for first time . . . . . . . . . .  Desperately seeking smooth green snakes . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Okeetee corn snake . . . . . . . . . .  Will Florida see the return of green turtles? . . . . . . . . . .  A surprising rescue: Montane trinket snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Pine snake . . . . . . . . . .  Crested Geckos linked to Salmonella outbreak . . . . . . . . . .  White-lipped pit vipers rule the trees of northern India . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Flipping ringnecks . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tiger-leg monkey frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Brazilian Horned Frog: Reminiscences and hopes . . . . . . . . . .  New frogs carve their own sex caves . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Mitchell's reed frog . . . . . . . . . .  Tar threatens Malaysian sea turtle breeding grounds . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Common frog . . . . . . . . . .  Cancer claims NM herpetologist Charlie Painter . . . . . . . . . .  A Black Hills Venture: The search for a red-bellied snake . . . . . . . . . .  How much do you know about snakes? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Northern Leopard Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Indian rock python freaks out tea farmers . . . . . . . . . .  Retirees research climate change in the desert . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Pacific tree frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Video of the Week: Venom extraction of king cobra . . . . . . . . . .  Meet kingsnake.com at the International Herp Symposium in San Antonio! . . . . . . . . . .  Red sand boa: A snake with two faces . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tegu . . . . . . . . . .  Warning for drivers in New England: Watch for frogs . . . . . . . . . .  Endangered but everywhere: Flattened musk turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Nile monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Boy brings snake that bit him to the hospital . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded anole . . . . . . . . . .  Python climbs tree in captivating video . . . . . . . . . .  Limbless wonders: The Western legless lizards . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Plumed basilisk . . . . . . . . . .  My first snake: The common trinket snake . . . . . . . . . .  Over 30,000 acres needed for tiger salamander recovery . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Roughneck monitor . . . . . . . . . .  The Southern copperhead: A marvel of camouflage . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Savu python . . . . . . . . . .  Gabon viper calls Angola home . . . . . . . . . .  Beware of dwarf caimans . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Coelen's python . . . . . . . . . .  River bath disturbance: Indian rat snake . . . . . . . . . .  SHS Los Angeles Meeting - Aug. 05, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Greater Cincinnati Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 05, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Central Illinois Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 06, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Calusa Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 06, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Southern Nevada Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 07, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Minnesota Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 07, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  Reptile Super Show - Aug 08-09, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Kansas City - Aug. 08, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Fort Pierce - Aug. 08, 2015 . . . . . . . . . .  All Ohio Reptile Show - Aug. 08, 2015 . . . . . . . . . . 

click to return to kingsnake.com index


full banner - advertise here $.50/1000 views year
Kincaid Products offers APEX Premium Reptile Substrate
pool banner - $25 year

Breeding the Veiled Chameleon

by Petra Spiess

Veiled chameleons are a hardy and prolific species that is relatively easy to breed. Captive bred veiled chameleon babies can be seen everywhere on the reptile market today, even in pet shops, and wholesale for anywhere from $25-50 depending on the age of the animal. The first step in breeding veiled chameleons is to make sure you have a male and a female. Fortunately, veiled chameleons can be reliably sexed at birth.

Male veiled chameleons posses a fleshy, triangular shaped appendage that arises from the crux of their rear feet. This is called a tarsal spur. Female veiled do not have tarsal spurs. Veiled can reach sexual maturity very early, some authors report as early 3 1/2 months, but 6 months is more average. Just because the animal is sexually mature at this age does not mean she must be bred. It has been stated in the literature that female veiled chameleons who are not bred will die egg bound carrying infertile eggs. This falsity has been perpetuated in the captive care literature. It is thought currently that egg binding is not caused specifically by infertile eggs, although it is true that female veileds with infertile eggs become egg bound more than females carrying viable eggs. This evidence is of course, anecdotal only. Excessive feeding and lack of calcium, and lack of a suitable egg laying site are all thought to contribute to eggbinding in veiled chameleons. Adult female veiled chameleons should not be fed all they want, their diet should be restricted to 20-30 insects per week, babies up to the age of 4-5 months can be fed 30-40 (small) insects per week. Calcium D3 supplementation should be provided at least twice a week.  It is also important to provide vitamin supplementation, about once a week.  Or, even better, gut load the crickets before they are fed to the chameleon.  When gut loading, use different foods such as collard greens, mustard greens, squash, carrots, baby cereal, and oranges, switching around the types of gutload material every few days.  What you are trying to achieve is variety to avoid dietary excesses or deficincies.  Even though veiled chameleons have been succesfully bred for many generations in captivity, we still know very little about their exact nutritional requirements.

Most female veileds advertise their sexual maturity by displaying robins-egg blue colors on their sides and casque. Not all females will display this however. The best method to judge a female's receptiveness to breeding is to but the female with a male. How she reacts is the best indication. If the female turns black, gapes widely, hisses, and rocks back and forth, upon seeing a male, she is not ready for mating. If the female displays this behavior, remove her from the enclosure immediately return her to her own cage. If she is receptive, she will retain her passive coloration, and slowly walk away from the male. After some running around, copulation will generally take place. When the female has been inseminated, she will conveniently let the keeper know by altering her coloration dramatically. Inseminated females turn black with yellow and green spots. When this coloration is observed, remove the female. After a successful copulation, oviposition will occur between 30-40 days, however, it is advisable to put an egg laying chamber in the cage on day 20 just in case.

The egglaying chamber is easily constructed by filling a 5 gallon bucket 6-12 inches full of moist sand or sand/peat moss mixture. What is wanted is a substrate that will facilitate tunneling. When the female is close to oviposition, she will often appear "restless" and wander around the cage looking for her preferred nesting spot. The female almost always choose the provided egg laying chamber, but occasionally, if a large plant is included, she will dig a nest below the root ball of a large potted plant. When she is serious about laying, she will begin to dig a tunnel, when the tunnel is sufficient for her needs (this usually take several hours) she will turn around and lay her eggs. After oviposition, the female will bury the eggs completely.  Take care when digging up the eggs, as the females tend to lay them somewhere at the bottom of the container, and in a very tightly packed ball.  Also, when looking for eggs, do not become disenheartened when you cannot find them right away, it often takes some serious, and delicate prospecting to find the egg mass (especially if the egg laying container is large!). Veiled chameleon clutches vary considerably, from 12 to as many as 80 eggs. In the wild, veileds lay moderate clutches of 12-20 eggs. Females that lay huge clutches generally do not live past a few clutches, the production of this many eggs is extremely taxing and it seems it directly contributes to their early demise. At this point, the eggs should be dug up and artificially incubated. The female will be exhausted (wouldn't you?), so she should be put in a quiet place with proper conditions and offered a little water and food. Veiled females can become receptive to breeding again several weeks after oviposition. Even without a second breeding, many females will go on to lay a second clutch from retained sperm 80-100 days after the first breeding.

Eggs can be incubated in slightly moist vermiculite at 75-80 degrees. Fertile eggs are bright white, and when illuminated from behind in a dark room, are suffused with blood vessels. Infertile eggs are usually yellow and do not have blood vessels. During incubation, the eggs must be spaced a least one inch apart (to prevent premature hatching) and should be kept in the dark. After 150-200 days, the eggs should hatch. Right before hatching, the eggs will "sweat"-form little beads of water on their surface, and will begin to cave in. A day or so after this, the eggs should hatch.

Hatchling veiled chameleons are relatively hardy and can be housed in 10 gallon vivaria with a screen top, or (even better) and all screen enclosure. The temperature on the warm end should be 88-95 degrees and 75-80 on the cool end. Small live plants, such as pothos, are good to include in the enclosure. The babies will eat them and they will provide some hiding spots. As hatchlings, 6-7 babies can be kept in one enclosure, as long as food is liberally provided. Baby veileds should be fed pinhead crickets supplemented with calcium powder every day. They should be sprayed to provide drinking water and to raise the relative humidity every other day. Once the babies are two months old, the sexes should be separated both physically and visually. At this time, most babies are well established and ready to go to new homes.

 

Sponsored Link
advertise here
New & Updated Business Listings
Looking for a reptile or amphibian related business? A reptile store, breeder, importer, maunfacturer or supplier? Our business directory lists some of the most popluar herp businesses in the world.
Locate a reptile or amphibian business by name:
New
• Buy Dubia Roaches
• Reptile Rapture
• Backwater Reptiles
• Dubi Deli
• Steel City Reptile Expo
• Reptilinks Whole Prey
• BoaMorph.com
• Xtreme Exotics
• GeckoDaddy.com
• Northern Rodents
Updated
• Bushmasters Online(Ripa)
• Eden Reptiles
• PerfectPrey.com
• Underground Reptiles
• ECO WEAR & Publishing
• Wicked Pythons
• Backwater Reptiles
• Eublah Exotics
• Henry Piorun Reptiles
• South Texas Dragons
list your business on kingsnake.com

Recent Chameleons Forum Posts
• Vieled Chameleon is brown after light, posted by alcade2015
• Reptariums, posted by csmgibeau
• Veiled Chameleons and Absorbine, posted by m0rgan
• chameleon skin has grey lines and spots, posted by Zeus86
• chameleon skin has grey lines and spots, posted by Zeus86
• Chameleons on Maui...where to find?, posted by Bluerosy
• sick veiled, posted by bkulich
• Breeders in the Carolinas, posted by chansman
• meru chameleon, posted by jimbogecko
• Mountian Laurel in Cham Cage???, posted by boachick1985
• Chamäleon namaquensis, posted by variuss11
• won't eat, posted by sullric1
• Veiled Breeding Help!!, posted by geckos_chams
• Breeders near Oregon Coast, posted by mynameisfyl
• sick chameleon?, posted by bkulich

Recent Chameleon Classifieds:
- Bearded Pygmy Chameleon ...
- JACKSONS CHAMELEON 25
- 4 TO 5 INCH VEILED CHAME...
- 9 TO 11 INCH VEILED CHAM...
- 12 INCH VEILED CHAMELEON...
- BABY VEILED CHAMELEONS 2...
- BEARDED PYGMY CHAMELEON ...
- Carpet Chameleons Free ...
- Flap Neck ampampamp Sene...
- Jacksons Chameleons Fre...
- Cuban False Chameleons ...
- Veiled Chameleons Free ...
- Graceful ampampamp Pygmy...
- USAMBARA PITTED PYGMY CH...
- Jacksons Chameleons on s...

Banner Pool
Click here for PerfectPrey.com
$100.year special flat rate banner! - click for info
Sites by OnlineHobbyist.com Inc:
kingsnake.com | NRAAC.ORG | ReptileBusinessGuide.com | ReptileShowGuide.com | ReptileShows.mobi | Connected By Cars | DesertRunner.org | Lizardkeepers | AprilFirstBioEngineering
GunHobbyist.com | GunShowGuide.com | GunShows.mobi | GunBusinessGuide.com | Music: club kingsnake | live stage magazine



powered by kingsnake.com
click here for The Bean Farm
pool banner - advertise here $50 year
click here for The Bean Farm
pool banner - $30 year
click here for BeardieBag.com
pool banner - $25 year
kingsnake.com® is a registered trademark of OnlineHobbyist.com, Inc.© 1997-
    - this site optimized for 1024x768 resolution -